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JSATS

Cabled Receivers

To monitor passage behavior and passage timing for JSATS-tagged fish at dams on the Columbia River, researchers deploy cabled JSATS receivers across the powerhouse and spillway. Each cabled receiver consists of four hydrophones connected to a four-channel receiver linked to a high-end desktop computer (Figure 1). Within the computer are two multichannel digital signal processing cards, a Global Positioning System (GPS) card, and the software necessary to acquire and decode acoustic signals from JSATS transmitters. To monitor the primary routes of passage available to migrating fish, two hydrophones are installed at different elevations on every pier nose (one deep and one shallow) between turbine units and spillway bays. Receiver clocks are synchronized to the universal GPS clock, resulting in detection time accuracy on a single system to 250 nanoseconds and across multiple systems to 500 nanoseconds. The time-of-arrival differences across multiple hydrophones are used to solve for the three-dimensional position of each tag transmission. These positions can then be used to form a precise three-dimensional track of the fish to determine the behavior or route of passage of tagged fish as they approach a dam.

More information on autonomous receivers and their deployment can be found at

Five three-dimensional JSATS receiver signal processing and data storage systems for collecting detailed behavior information on acoustic-tagged fish.
Figure 1. Five three-dimensional JSATS receiver signal processing and data storage systems for collecting detailed behavior information on acoustic-tagged fish.

Aerial view of John Day Dam on the Columbia River depicting tracks of acoustic-tagged yearling Chinook salmon approaching the dam during spring 2008.
Figure 2. Aerial view of John Day Dam on the Columbia River depicting tracks of JSATS acoustic-tagged yearling Chinook salmon approaching the dam during spring 2008.

3D tracks of JSATS acoustic-tagged Chinook salmon passing the spillway at John Day Dam on the Columbia River in 2008. Red squares represent hydrophones deployed on the spillway piers and each colored track represents an individual tagged fish�s path to a passage route.
Figure 3. 3D tracks of JSATS acoustic-tagged Chinook salmon passing the spillway at John Day Dam on the Columbia River in 2008. Red squares represent hydrophones deployed on the spillway piers and each colored track represents an individual tagged fish's path to a passage route.

JSATS hydrophones used with the 3D cabled system to assess passage behavior of JSATS acoustic tagged juvenile salmon at hydroelectric facilities.
Figure 4. JSATS hydrophones used with the 3D cabled system to assess passage behavior of JSATS acoustic tagged juvenile salmon at hydroelectric facilities.

Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System

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Licensing and Commercialization